Am I a caregiver?

caregiver 4Do you awaken at night to help your spouse to the bathroom?
Do you arrange your schedule to fit your mother’s doctors’ appointments?
Do you take an elderly aunt to the grocery store and help her with housework?
Is your health being affected due to added stress from caring for your parents?
Do you find the added care responsibilities for your loved one interfering with your work and daily life?

What do all these people have in common?

  • An 82-year-old man caring for his wife with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • A 65-year-old woman caring for her husband who has suffered a stroke.
  • A 47-year-old woman caring for her 78-year-old mother with Parkinson’s.
  • A 38-year-old man helping his 92-year- old neighbor down the street with yard work, housework and transportation.
  • A grandmother caring for her grandchild.

Answer: They are all caregivers!

Many people don't think of themselves as caregivers, but if one or more of the statements below apply to you, then you are a caregiver. Do you

  • provide direct care to someone--such as feeding, bathing, dressing, supervision, or any other type of assistance?
  • provide supportive care such as delivering meals, giving rides, calling or stopping in to check on someone?
  • feel concern that someone you know isn't taking care of him or herself?
  • feel concern that a caregiver you know is struggling and needs help?

You are not alone. Caregiver Statistics

  • There are 25 million caregivers in the United States.
  • caregiver 3One out of four households nation-wide are involved in caregiving for someone age 50 and older.
  • Family members and friends provide over 80% of all home care.
  • An estimated 20%-40% of caregivers are raising children while simultaneously caring for older adults.
  • Four million children live in a household headed by a grandparent.

Am I a caregiver?

caregiver 4Do you awaken at night to help your spouse to the bathroom?
Do you arrange your schedule to fit your mother’s doctors’ appointments?
Do you take an elderly aunt to the grocery store and help her with housework?
Is your health being affected due to added stress from caring for your parents?
Do you find the added care responsibilities for your loved one interfering with your work and daily life?

What do all these people have in common?

  • An 82-year-old man caring for his wife with Alzheimer’s disease.
  • A 65-year-old woman caring for her husband who has suffered a stroke.
  • A 47-year-old woman caring for her 78-year-old mother with Parkinson’s.
  • A 38-year-old man helping his 92-year- old neighbor down the street with yard work, housework and transportation.
  • A grandmother caring for her grandchild.

Answer: They are all caregivers!

Many people don't think of themselves as caregivers, but if one or more of the statements below apply to you, then you are a caregiver. Do you

  • provide direct care to someone--such as feeding, bathing, dressing, supervision, or any other type of assistance?
  • provide supportive care such as delivering meals, giving rides, calling or stopping in to check on someone?
  • feel concern that someone you know isn't taking care of him or herself?
  • feel concern that a caregiver you know is struggling and needs help?

You are not alone. Caregiver Statistics

  • There are 25 million caregivers in the United States.
  • caregiver 3One out of four households nation-wide are involved in caregiving for someone age 50 and older.
  • Family members and friends provide over 80% of all home care.
  • An estimated 20%-40% of caregivers are raising children while simultaneously caring for older adults.
  • Four million children live in a household headed by a grandparent.

National Caregiver Program (NFCSP)

National Family Caregiver Support Program (NFCSP)

The Family Caregiver Support Program can assist you!

caregiver 1
The Wisconsin National Family Caregiver Support Program (NFCSP) offers information, support, and resources to assist family caregivers (spouse, adult child, other relative, friend or neighbor) with their concerns related to caregiving. Located in every county and tribe in Wisconsin, the NFCSP helps caregivers find solutions to their caregiving dilemmas. Whether arranging for services, e.g. respite care, transportation, etc., or helping families understand their options for care, the Family Caregiver Support Program gives caregivers access to the information and services that can help them in the often rewarding, sometimes challenging, role of caregiver

 
It offers the following for family caregivers:

  • Information about available services
  • Assistance in gaining access to services
  • Individual counseling, support groups and training
  • Respite care to help caregivers take a break from providing care, and
  • Supplemental services

Who is eligible for the program?

caregiver 2The Wisconsin National Family Caregiver Support Program provides help to family members, neighbors, and friends who care for

  • persons age 60 and older, or
  • persons with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders regardless of age

The program also assists grandparents or relative caregivers 55 years of age and older who

  • care for children under age 19, or
  • care for a relative with a disability who is 19 to 59 years of age

To learn about the Family Caregiver Support Program, contact the Rock County Council on Aging,
Family Caregiver Support Specialist at 608-758-8455.


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Alzheimer's Caregiver Program (AFCSP)

Alzheimer's Family Caregiver Support Program (AFCSP)

Did You Know?
Alzheimer’s disease attacks the memory and ability to think, reason, and judge. People with Alzheimer’s disease gradually forget who they are, where they live, and how to function in daily life. Families struggle emotionally, physically and financially in order to provide adequate care. Over 116, 000 people in Wisconsin have dementia. Approximately 70% of those with the disease are cared for in their own home

Rock County residents with Alzheimer’s and their families may be eligible for the Alzheimer’s Family Caregiver Support Program

coa handsWhat is the Alzheimer’s Family Caregiver Support Program (AFCSP)?
The AFCSP was created by the Wisconsin legislature in 1985 in response to the stress and needs of families caring for someone with Alzheimer’s Disease or other irreversible dementia. The purpose of AFCSP is to make an array of community services available to these families in hopes of enhancing lives and keeping people in their homes as long as possible. The program is available in every county throughout the state.

Who is eligible for the Alzheimer’s Family Caregiver Support Program (AFCSP)?
A single person or couple may have an annual income of $40,000 or less. If the income is above $40,000, the cost related to Alzheimer’s may be subtracted from the gross income. If these costs bring the income below $40,000 the person would be eligible.
There is no asset limit for the program.

The person must also have a written confirmation by a physician of a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease or any other irreversible dementia.

Services offered by AFCSP
In Rock County, up to $2000 per year is made available to each participant in the program. Participants may receive a variety of services offered through various providers of service throughout the county. No cash grants are given.

Examples of services available:

  • Respite care or home care services (personal care assistance, meal prep, medication assistance and monitoring, homemaker services, yard work and
    snow removal, etc.)
  • Emergency response system
  • Transportation expenses
  • Incontinence supplies
  • Home safety modifications
  • Medications for dementia
  • Home-delivered meals
  • Specialized clothing
  • Activity or hobby supplies
  • Other needed services to help

NOTE: Due to limited annual funding, a waiting list may exist for these services. Every effort will be made to provide you with funding as quickly as possible.

How do I apply for these services?
To apply for this program, or for more information, contact the Family Caregiver Support Specialist at (608) 758-8455.


Check Out This Workshop
“Powerful Tools For Caregivers”

Powerful Tools for Caregivers is a once a week workshop for six-weeks that will teach you how to take care of yourself while caring for someone else. By taking care of your own physical, emotional, and financial needs, you become a better caregiver.


Resources

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